Dating british guys vs american guys

The night I met George, the epitome of a charming Englishman, I was immediately drawn to him. After a long night out wandering the city with George, he put me into a cab. It hadn't even crossed my mind, but after the aloof coolness of the hipsters who populated my alma mater, Englishmen—with their jokes and their endearing awkwardness and their humor—were a welcome change.

Even though he wasn't stereotypically handsome, he was delightful and quick to make fun of himself—and to tease me: the typical American. When I wrote my college friend Rachel about George, she wrote back: What is with you and English guys?

As a Brit married to an American woman I feel I can have a go at writing this… Aversion To Therapy The British male tendency to keep a stiff upper lip, repress their emotions and only ever consider visiting a hospital when a bone is poking out through the skin is not attractive. Due to a lower legal age (16 for entering a pub, 18 for buying alcohol) in the UK, British men see going out for a drink – and even having one too many – as a regular and normal part of their lives.

Being in touch with your inner self (or even admitting emotions exist outside the realm of sports teams) is a good thing however, and something that American men seem to do well — or at least better than Brits. They could have been drinking for years before you even had your first beer, so in a country that had Prohibition and still has “dry” counties, it’s not surprising that attitudes to drinking are different – and that it’s something you might find hard to get used to. Sweets For My Sweet Jokes about bad British gnashers aside (and don’t all American children get braces on their teeth regardless of whether they need them anyway?

He was English, witty, slightly bumbling, and had a crooked smile. He was also part of an emerging pattern: He wasn't the first British guy I'd romantically clicked with. When I first moved to Beijing right after graduating from Brown, I never intended to fall for so many English guys.

I'd like to think that I did know, but judging by how headfirst I was diving into the relationship, I couldn't have been sure.

What other traits should American women expect when dating a Brit?

I never thought that the cultural background of a dating prospect would make much of a difference when it came to relationships.

I’m not to judge that one is better than the other, and mind you, my observations are based on my own experiences as well as a group of women I’ve interviewed in the last two years.

Rules, regulations and expensive game tickets changed all that, so you can be sure that every British man watching Fox Sports won’t turn into a baying gorilla as soon as he sees a soccer ball.

Also, many British men love cricket — a complicated game full of rules that looks like a bit like baseball and has some of the same principles — though everyone plays in matching white uniforms and the games last many hours, even days. Despite any talk of today’s Britain being a “classless society,” distinctions and differences assumed about someone’s background, education, job, and bank balance still cloud many people’s judgment there.

You’ll find this a challenge, though luckily cricket pitches are few and far between in the U. Then there’s rugby, though that’s very close in spirit to U. football — though rugby players don’t have all that “ooo, don’t hurt me” protective equipment. In the dating arena, this means that you may find British men can be either snobby and dismissive, or jealous and resentful.

America has historically been divided more along racial lines than in terms of class — though love conquers all (or at least it should).

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